Your search returned 20 results.

94 points

Single Malts of Scotland 21 year old Ardmore 1998 Single Cask (Cask No. 750753), 50.2%

Exhibit A for never judging a whisky by its color: This straw-pale malt shows depth and complexity many sherry-dark whiskies would envy. The nose is briny and smoky, with a seaweed character; lemon poppyseed muffin and almond cake are present without water. Add a few drops, however, and fresh orchard fruit emerges, sweet and clean, and carries into the rounded, silky palate where it mingles with salt water, black pepper, a squeeze of lemon, and smoky peat. Good length on the finish, which has oak, nuts, and cigar wrapper. A paragon of balance. (240 bottles)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

94 points

Single Malts of Scotland 23 year old Ben Nevis 1996 Single Cask (Cask No. 1479), 52.7%

Thick with sherry fruit on the nose: cooked dark berries, raisins, and dried figs, though the fruit becomes more jammy when water is added. There’s also dark chocolate, hazelnuts, and leather. The palate is equally thick and chewy, offering figs, raisins, dark chocolate, coffee bean, and raspberry cake filling, as well as green apple and guava candy showing this whisky’s maturity. It finishes with coffee, chocolate, dark berries, white pepper, orange pith, and oak that verges on bitterness, but never tips over the edge. Stately and dignified. (405 bottles; U.S. exclusive)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

94 points

Single Malts of Scotland 21 year old Glenburgie 1998 Single Cask (Cask No. 900896), 55.2%

Powerfully tropical on the nose, with guava, jackfruit, mango, and papaya in spades; hibiscus, blueberry-pomegranate juice, almond, and a hint of caramel drizzle as well. The palate delivers on that aromatic promise, bursting with guava and papaya, as well as mouth-puckering citrus and almond pastry. The lengthy finish is still fruity but leans into dryness, with almond and clean cereal notes and, at the last, a wisp of cigar. Don’t be afraid to add water if you wish to reduce the alcohol; the intense flavors remain. (251 bottles; U.S. exclusive)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

92 points

Single Malts of Scotland 30 year old Glenrothes 1989 Single Cask (Cask No. 18177), 41.9%

The nose is aromatic, with peach blossom, apple skins, sugared strawberries, strands of cotton candy, biscuity malt, blanched almonds, and green tea leaves. Rounded and soft on the palate, there are flavors of apricots, peaches, and bright red cherries, firmly supported by malt; with water, the fruit is more pronounced and uplifted by a bracing tide of nuts, milk chocolate, oak, and tea leaves. The finish retains fruitiness but is focused on nuts, tobacco, and leathery oak. (92 bottles; U.S. exclusive)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

92 points

Single Malts of Scotland 14 year old Ledaig 2005 Single Cask (Cask No. 900178), 55.4%

On the nose, intense fruit underlaid with smoke: a grilled half-peach. Hints of cinnamon and milk chocolate; blackberry jam; brisket. With water, the peat turns slightly rubbery and mineral, and that minerality carries into the palate, balanced by juicy berries, Raisinets, and almonds. Curling wisps of pipe smoke wrap around smoked almonds and sea salt-sprinkled dark chocolate on the finish. Though hefty, it’s pretty easy to drink at full strength; add a bit of water and you’ll soften the alcohol without diminishing any of the flavor. (607 bottles; U.S. exclusive)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

92 points

Single Malts of Scotland 12 year old Linkwood 2007 Single Cask (Cask No. 804447), 55.8%

The nose is rich but not heavy, showing applesauce, poached pears, grape jelly, raisin scones, nutty dark chocolate, and a hint of orange. Zingy with citrus oil, especially lemon, on the palate, though that’s tempered by oak, raisins, toasted nuts, dark chocolate, and leather. It finishes with more nuts, coffee bean, pipe tobacco, and persistent lemon oil; a final note of poached pear recalls the nose. Elegant. (246 bottles; U.S. exclusive)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

91 points

Single Malts of Scotland 30 year old Imperial 1989 Single Cask (Cask No. 362), 43.3%

Perfumy in both aroma and flavor: rose potpourri, peach blossom, lemon drops, strawberry shortcake, talcum powder, and clean cereal notes on the nose. Candied rose petal on the palate, as well as dried fruit (especially with water), rich and well-integrated spice, cacao nibs, and dry oak. It’s distinctive and well-balanced, even when the oak seems a touch bitter. The finish is dry and leathery, with pipe tobacco, cinnamon, and, still, that rose note. (172 bottles; U.S. exclusive)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

90 points

Single Malts of Scotland 10 year old Caol Ila 2009 Single Cask (Cask No. 317841), 58.3%

A whole lotta beach: oyster shells, brine, vanilla saltwater taffy, and bonfire, plus fresh coconut shavings, jasmine, and freesia. Oily in the mouth, it’s drying without water, highlighting salinity, smoke, cigar wrapper, lemon oil, and Jordan almonds. With water, lemon, vanilla taffy, and mouth-puckering saline; the smoke is less overt. It finishes clean, sweet, and simple, with grilled lemon and lingering smoke. (298 bottles; U.S. exclusive)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

88 points

Single Malts of Scotland 13 year old Glen Elgin 2006 Single Cask (Cask No. 9800011), 54.1%

A bit reticent on the nose, with light aromas of jasmine, freesia, coconut, vanilla, and hints of kiwi, pineapple, and strawberry. The palate is oily and highlights more coconut, pineapple, vanilla, and strawberry, plus lemon, sandalwood, and mingled spices. On the finish, crushed nuts top a chocolate and vanilla malted milkshake, and lengthy oak caps things off. (156 bottles; U.S. exclusive)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

87 points

Single Malts of Scotland 26 year old Mortlach 1993 Single Cask (Cask No. 86), 60.5%

Intensely fruity and floral on the nose, like a rosebush-lined berry patch; there’s also shortcake with lemon drizzle, almonds, and orange peel. With water, the fruit character deepens and takes on an edge of marzipan. The palate fizzes with citrus and soap flavors, tempered by milk chocolate, tobacco, and bitter leather. Without water, it’s intensely drying, though with it, the character turns cloying: Tread carefully. (134 bottles; U.S. exclusive)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2020)

87 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Longmorn) 1992, 49.7%

Longmorn always has this fruitcake thing going on and this is no exception. A sherry hoggie  helped provide sultana, cake mix, grilled almond, rhubarb puree, and a little cigar box. The palate is very fruity, with light Darjeeling-like tannins, then red fruits. It becomes nuttier as it moves and needs water to add ripeness to the stone fruit base. Highly recommended and extremely well priced. £80

Reviewed by: (Fall 2014)

84 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Tormore) 1988, 64.2%

There’s something rather round peg in a square hole about Tormore, that grand urban palace of a distillery in wildest Speyside. The whisky, sadly, is often the same. Here, though, things look promising to start with: rice crackers, and a spicy, rye-like hardness on top of a vanilla-accented, sweet trail mix of a nose with some earthiness behind. The palate, for me, is still too rigid. For all its efforts to relax, this Tormore remains tense. £90

Reviewed by: (Spring 2014)

84 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Glen Grant) 1992, 57.8%

The initial nose is soft fruits doused in condensed milk, which contributes to an overall impression of light toffee and, weirdly for this distillery in its contemporary guise, some smoke. The fruits manage to mix the ripe and slightly sour. Quite intense; it needs water, which calms proceedings allowing typical Glen Grant purity to come through. The fruits now have some added weight and, again, that smokiness. Intriguing! £75

Reviewed by: (Fall 2014)

83 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Longmorn) 1990, 48.1%

Longmorn is one of Speyside’s fruit bombs, something which remains true here, even if in slightly paler guise than usual. Instead of ripe autumn fruits, here you get kiwi, William pear, green plum, even green tomato, and a faint blossom reminiscent of the almond notes of sakura (cherry blossom). I’d keep water well away, such is this light, lacy Longmorn’s fragility. £73

Reviewed by: (Spring 2014)

82 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Bunnahabhain) 25 year old, 50.4%

Gold. Quite sweet and spicy nose. Light cinnamon and that distillery ginger edge. There remains a light cereal aspect to the background, but it is considerably more youthful than the age suggests. The palate is equally sweet and direct, with excellent spicy concentration. Water shows that there is some weight here, reminiscent of honey-nut cornflakes (with cream). The nose now hints at some oxidation, the palate retains peppery freshness. It’s another I’d have kept in cask. £135

Reviewed by: (Spring 2015)

82 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Glenrothes) 1990, 49.4%

Light gold. From a refill bourbon cask, here we have more marzipan and some light maltiness alongside very fresh fruit and delicate vanilla. This is Rothes in slightly lean and hungry mode, with its signature fruits and spices in the background. Needs water to smooth things out. When that happens, there’s lemon drizzle cake, leafiness, and walnut flour. A little short on the finish.  £90

Reviewed by: (Fall 2014)

81 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at BenRiach) 24 year old, 50.2%

Very fresh and quite light in color, suggestive of only light cask conversation. BenRiach’s fruits are there with hints of apricot, even some gooseberry. Very light malty background, and then a whiff of witch hazel. In time, it sweetens into banana and pineapple. The palate is clean, though pretty hot, with that mature BenRiach fizzy spiciness on the back palate. Can’t help but feel that this would have been a great 30 year old. £95

Reviewed by: (Spring 2015)

81 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Allt-a-Bhainne) 1992, 50.2%

Not often seen as a single bottling, here we have Speyside’s modernist distillery in typically delicate guise, with plenty of subtle florals (think hyacinth and daffodils), something which is amplified with water. Imagine a cool day in early spring and you are pretty much there. The mouth is clean and fresh, with a little acidity. Water doesn’t damage the palate delivery, but neither does it particularly enhance things. A sorbet rather than a meal. £65

Reviewed by: (Spring 2014)

80 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Glenallachie) 1992, 47.9%

There is something very bedtime drink about this Glenallachie, without it being a dram to have before retiring for the night. It’s to do with the aromatic sensation of powdered malted milk and cocoa powder. The palate is simple, with some fresh apple, pear juice, and a lightly sour edge. The draff/malted milk re-emerges in the middle of the tongue. With water, pears come through, making it similar to a tequila blanco. All rather delicate. £63

Reviewed by: (Spring 2014)

79 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Craigellachie) 1996, 52.7%

Craigellachie is one of Scotland’s most interesting distilleries: its worm tubs providing a deliberately sulfury new make whose aromas flash off after maturation to reveal a deeply floral, pineapple-accented palate. Here, sadly, an inactive cask has meant that cabbagey sulfur has not been fully worked out. The fleshiness of the mature spirit is emerging, but this should have been kept in cask for another five years or so. Lacks balance and maturity. £60

Reviewed by: (Spring 2014)


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